We visited Marco Pantani’s museum in Cesenatico

Few days ago we visited Marco Pantani Museum in Cesenatico, city where Marco was born.
In Cesenatico, in the hometown of Marco Pantani, near the railway station premises, there is a section called Spazio Pantani, entirely dedicated to the Champion Romagna. Inside it is possible to trace the career of the “The Pirate” through the display of photos, memorabilia, bikes, jerseys and audiovisual materials.

The structure is divided into 3 areas of about 100 square meters each, named with the names of the mountains that Marco Pantani won (Mortirolo, Alpe d’Huez and Sala Bocchetta).

Spazio Pantani was born thanks to the desire of Pantani family, Municipality of Cesenatico and Fondazione Marco Pantani of creating a structure to keep alive the memory of the Champion of Romagna and his enterprises. The museum was opened to the public in October 2006 and is managed by the Pantani family in order to generate profits to be donated for beneficence. Also tha gadgets sold in this site contribute to realization of our charitable activities.

Spazio Pantani is open to visitors seven days a week and also it provides the possibility of special openings for large groups or special events such as conferences, book presentations, musical performances, departures for tours by bicycle.

It was an awesome day, an amazing emotional experience! Ride in Peace Marco!

Bicycle maintenance – OLDBICI’s Checklist

Most people who ride bicycles want to keep them in good shape, but first they need to know where to begin.

Everyone understands the importance of regular preventative maintenance on an automobile, but many folks ignore this concept when it comes to their bicycle.
A bicycle is a big investment and it’s important to keep it in sound working order not only for top performance, but also for the safety of the rider and those riding around him/her. You might say you should get into the habit of caring for your bike like your life depended on it…it does!

* Each Ride: Note-These procedures are necessary to ensure your personal safety. Failure to perform these checks could result in serious injury. I borrowed an acronym from the League of American Bicyclists and added a slight variation to help you with your daily safety check…don’t overlook it, it’s important!

ABC Wheel Quick!

A = Air: ensure proper tire inflation and check for tire wear
B = Brakes and Bars: check proper brake function (proper cable tension and pad alignment). Check handlebars for cracks which indicate an impending failure
C = Chain and Cables: check for tight links and fraying cables

Wheel = Check for trueness and spoke tension/damage
Quick = Quick Releases (Ensure QRs are fully seated…do not close against the fork, seatstay, or chainstay which may prevent full seating of QR)


OLDBICI‘s Checklist


Before Every Ride:

  • Check tire air pressure
  • Check brakes and cables
  • Be sure your crank set is tight
  • Be sure quick release hubs are tight

After Every Ride:

  • Inspect tires for glass, gravel shards, and cuts on tread and sidewall
  • Check wheels for true
  • Clean the bike’s mechanical parts as necessary. Once a week or every 200 miles: Lubricate chain (with dry lube; or every other week or 400 miles with wet chain lube)

Once a Month: (Note-These procedures will maximize your performance and minimize future costly repairs)

  • Completely clean the bike, including the drivetrain if necessary
  • Inspect chain and freewheel. Measure the chain for wear, check for tight links and replace the chain if necessary
  • Inspect and lubricate brake levers, derailleurs and all cables
  • Inspect pedals. Inspect tires for wear; rotate or replace if needed

Don’t forget to Inspect and check for looseness in the: Stem binder bolt, Handlebar binder bolt, Seatpost binder bolt (or quick release), Seat fixing bolt, Crank bolts, Chainring bolts, Derailleur mounting bolts, Bottle cage bolts, Rack mounting bolts, Brake and derailleur cable anchors, Brake and shifter lever mounting bolts, Brake mounting bolts.

Every Three Months:

  • Inspect frame and fork for paint cracks or bulges that may indicate frame or part damage; pay particular attention to all frame joints
  • Visually inspect for bent components: seat rails, seat post, stem, handlebars, chainrings, crankarms, brake calipers and brake levers

Every Six Months:
Inspect and readjust bearings in headset, hubs, pedals and bottom bracket (if possible; some sealed cartridge bearings cannot be adjusted, only replaced)

Annually:
Disassemble and overhaul; replace all bearings (if possible); and remove and if necessary replace all brake and shift cables. This should be performed at 6,000 miles if you ride more than that per year. If you often ride in the rain who get dirty should overhaul their bicycles more often.

One of the first steps to being a winner is attitude. A well maintained bike bolsters confidence and enhances a positive attitude!

Why ride vintage bicycles ?

There are many reasons why vintage bicycles are superior to the modern day mass- produced, low-priced bicycles that you can find at your local bike shop.
I won’t even bother to discuss bikes built for department stores – those are landfill bikes that are utterly worthless and designed to be thrown away. Don’t buy them, ever.

But why ride vintage when you can buy a reasonably priced bike and brand new? Well, here is my list of the most important reasons:

Build quality: by this I mean the quality of the frame and the components. Vintage steel bicycles were mostly hand-crafted by experienced artisans. Many builders also crafted or modified their own components. That’s far more life than you will see in today’s frames, where fork recall, aluminum fatigue, and carbon fiber failures are routine. Today’s production bikes are simply not built to last a lifetime, at all. If you want a bike to treasure and pass on to future generations, don’t buy a production bike – either order custom or, for far less money, buy a vintage bicycle.

Ease of repairs and component integration: pretty much all vintage components are repairable with simple parts that you can make yourself if you don’t have spares handy. They are also easily understood, and learning basic bike maintenance is much easier for owners of vintage bicycles.

Environmental Reasons – Sustainability: for me, environmental reasons for not buying a new bike trump almost all the other reasons. Department store bikes end up in landfills because their components are made to be thrown away, and so are the frames. Each new bike manufactured adds roughly 530 lbs of deadly greenhouse gases to our atmosphere. In 2015, 17.4 million NEW bicycles were manufactured and sold. So, doing the math, that translates into 9.2 BILLION POUNDS of greenhouse gases spewing out into the environment in one year alone, all due to the consumer demand for new bicycles. Don’t buy a new bike for bicycle rides through your city! Fix up the one you have or buy vintage bicycles.

Francesco Moser Museum – Maso Villa Warth

Il Museo Francesco Moser non è un monumento alla “grandeur”. È una bella storia di famiglia. Invece di parole, oggetti. «Lo abbiamo fatto per gli sportivi, per la gente che passa. Chi viene a prendere il vino da noi, ci fa mille domande. Qui ci sono risposte», spiega Francesco. Gli oggetti, però, hanno un’anima, parlano. «La maglia rosa è per me il ricordo più caro. Ho inseguito la vittoria al Giro per 11 anni pri­ma di coglierla».
Le biciclette, come insetti eleganti, sono allineate su una pista di legno d’abete lunga 16 metri. Le bacheche contengono maglie e medaglie. Le coppe scintillano nelle vetrine. «Sarà una questione genetica. Forse una tradizione culturale. Ma ci troviamo bene in sella», dice Fran­cesco. «La bicicletta è stata il nostro ca­vallo dei sogni, ma an­che della realtà».

by La Gazzetta dello Sport